Established in 1984 TED has become an absolute treasure trove of wisdom and inspiration on many subjects including some unforgettable talks about kids, creativity and education. Here’s our pick of the five best.


Schools kill Creativity

Sir Ken Robinson, author, educator and patron of the Institute of Imagination (ioi) makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.


Teach girls bravery, not perfection

Reshma Saujani, the founder of Girls Who Code has taken up the charge to socialize young girls to take risks and learn to program — two skills they need to move society forward. “To truly innovate, we cannot leave behind half of our population” she says. “I need each of you to tell every young woman you know to be comfortable with imperfection.”


How movies teach manhood

When Colin Stokes’ three year old son caught a glimpse of “Star Wars,” he was instantly obsessed. But what messages did he absorb from the sci-fi classic? Stokes asks for more movies that send positive messages to boys: that cooperation is heroic, and respecting women is as manly as defeating the villain.


For parents, happiness is a very high bar

The parenting section of the bookstore is overwhelming—it’s “a giant, candy-coloured monument to our collective panic,” as writer Jennifer Senior puts it. Why is parenthood filled with so much anxiety? Because the goal of modern, middle-class parents—to raise happy children—is so elusive. In this honest talk, she offers some kinder and more achievable aims.


What adults can learn from kids

Child prodigy Adora Svitak says the world needs “childish” thinking: bold ideas, wild creativity and especially optimism. Kids’ big dreams deserve high expectations, she says, starting with grownups’ willingness to learn from children as much as to teach.


Check out thousands of talks on all kinds of topics, not just parenting, on the TED website, YouTube Channel or download the app and listen to the Podcast.

 

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